The Pros and Cons of Living in Park Slope


The Pros of Living in Park Slope:

The Cons of Living in Park Slope:

After taking the above photos while coming home from Prospect Park via Garfield st., I decided it was way too nice to stay at home, despite having a quite a bit of work to do. There’s a little community garden a block from house, so I did the right, wanna-be-young-intellectual thing and took my little moleskin and my Lincoln Center playbill and tried to write from a “pristine” park bench.

But, alas, this community garden is in Park Slope. And that means screaming children. They were semi-bearable. Until they came for me…

Little Girl 1: Are you a kid?
Me: Um. Uh
Little Girl 1: I said, ‘ARE YOU A KID?’
Me: Why are you asking me that?
Little Girl 2: Well, we you came in, we looked at you, and we wondering….
Little Girl 1: Listen. How old are you?
Me: 26
Little Girl 2: Oh. She’s a mom.
Me [loud, indignant]: I’m not a mom!!

The kids took a step back and looked each other with devilish embarrassment, before running away. Even after they were gone, concentration was tough. The only words I could hear in my head were, “I’m not a mom.” On the upside, the drone made it even easier to tune out the shrieking.

Not so for the girl reading at nearby table with her dog and boyfriend. On her way out she turned to me and said, “So much for a quiet garden! I couldn’t take it anymore!”

“I know!” I concurred, and then, grateful for sounding board, relayed my awful story. She cringed. “Oh no! I’m 26, too!”

I was on a roll. “Yeah! And if by ‘not a mom’ you mean ‘failure!’ Obviously they’ve been talking to my grandmother.” But instead of laughing, a look overwhelming pity flooded the girl’s face. “Ohhh. I’m sorry!”

Not the desired reaction. I wanted to defend myself, to blurt out, “I was joking! My grandmother loves that I’m incapable of starting a family or even engaging in healthy emotional attachment! The bad date stories are the only thing that keeps her going through her old age!”

But she wished me good luck, took her dog home and left her boyfriend in the not-quiet garden. And there I was, a Park Slope Disaster: No Baby, No Boyfriend, No Dog. (I did have some carrots with me, but I’m pretty sure that since they weren’t purchased at the Co-Op, that’s also a #ParkSlopeFail.)

But it got me thinking. Maybe it’s time. I don’t know if it’s the fact that Spring is here, that I’m ready for a change, that the whole world is in Chaos and going at it solo for the sake of pride doesn’t seem worth it anymore.

I think I’m ready for a dog.

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9 thoughts on “The Pros and Cons of Living in Park Slope

  1. Just as I finish reading this Amy sends out the email asking for Mother’s Day-themed article ideas.

    I decided to search “mother’s day” on findingDulcinea. The second result was:

    < HREF="http://www.findingdulcinea.com/guides/Health/Counseling-and-Therapy.pg_00.html" REL="nofollow">Counseling and Therapy Web Guide: Types of Therapy<>That is a smart search engine.

    Reply
  2. The Pro:
    –Being in the Slope reminds you of your youth and (inevitably) your mom.

    The Con:
    –Being in the Slope reminds you of your youth and (inevitably) your mom.

    Reply
  3. I’m loving this post.

    As if it isn’t hard enough to work out what you want from life, others feel they have to judge you or feel sorry for you, too!

    My mother has asked me if I’m jealous of my sister, with her happy marriage and kids. NOT!!

    My father turned to me on the day my first niece was born and asked me when I’m going to have children, too. Never mind that I was and still am, single.

    My sister has even been getting in on the act, albeit, much more subtlely.

    There’s no one in my family (thank goodness for some of my friends!) who considers my unattached state of life to be empowering.

    Seriously! I love kids, and I would love to have them. More than that, I’d love to have a great partner that adores me as much as I would adore him. BUT – not everyone gets to have that.

    It should never be something we are made to feel embarrassed about. Coz its hard enough when you don’t fit society’s expectations…

    Reply
  4. A few years ago my mom told me that the waiting list for my grade school was getting pretty long and I should think about donating some money. Yep. I was 23 and my mom was worrying about where my unborn child would go to school. She’s also continuously warning me not to eat so much tuna. Mercury and all that.

    Reply
  5. You’re either a child or a mom. That’s an interesting philosophical debate, I think.

    But man, oh, man, what a damn wrench in your quiet time.

    Reply
  6. You are taking the comments of a child way beyond where they need to go. You should appreciate that the kid just wanted to play with you and you looked young enough to play with them. Kids are everywhere these days which is much different than 10-15 years ago when everyone escaped to the suburbs to raise their family. It’s a good thing for the city that families are sticking around.

    Reply
  7. You are taking the comments of a child way beyond where they need to go. You should appreciate that the kid just wanted to play with you and you looked young enough to play with them. Kids are everywhere these days which is much different than 10-15 years ago when everyone escaped to the suburbs to raise their family. It’s a good thing for the city that families are sticking around.

    Reply

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